FRUIT JUICE INFORMATION

Drinking 100 Percent Fruit Juice is Associated with
Improved Nutrient Intake in Children and Adolescents

New research shows those who drink 100 percent juice have
higher intakes of key nutrients compared to non-consumers

WASHINGTON, DC (March 27, 2012) – Consumption of 100 percent fruit juice is closely linked to improved nutrient adequacy among 2-18 year olds, according to new research published in the current online issue of Public Health Nutrition, the Juice Products Association reports today.

The new study from researchers at the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center and Baylor College of Medicine highlights the effect that consumption of fruit juice had on select nutrients (ones that have been identified as “nutrients of concern” and are most frequently under-consumed in children’s diets), namely: dietary fiber; vitamins A, C, and E; magnesium; folate; phosphorus; calcium; and potassium.

According to the findings, with the exception of vitamin E and fiber, consumption of 100 percent juice was associated with higher usual intakes of all of the aforementioned nutrients. (Of note, although juice drinkers did not exhibit higher intakes of dietary fiber, their fiber intake was not lower than nonconsumers, as experts have previously speculated may occur). These results underscore the role of 100 percent juice as a nutrient-dense beverage – a classification also noted in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

“One hundred percent fruit juice plays an important role in the diets of children and teens, supplying important nutrients during crucial years for growth and development,” notes lead researcher Dr. Carol O’Neil. “Drinking 100 percent juice should be encouraged as part of an overall balanced diet.”

Additionally, this study is the first to show that fruit juice consumers were more likely to exceed the Adequate Intake for calcium than those not consuming juice.  It is unclear if this is due to intake of calcium-fortified juices or if fruit juice was more likely to be consumed alongside calcium-rich foods and beverages.

In this study, the researchers used data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to examine the diets of a nationally representative sample of children and adolescents ages 2-18 years.

Drinking 100 Percent Fruit Juice is Linked
to Higher Intake of Essential Nutrients

New research shows adults who drink fruit juice have improved dietary adequacy compared to non-consumers

BOSTON, MA (November 9, 2010) – With so few Americans consuming the recommended amounts of fruit each day, finding quick and simple ways to add additional fruit servings – and the important nutrients they provide – is more critical than ever. Although USDA recognizes that 4-oz of 100 percent juice supplies one serving (1/2 cup) of fruit, there is still confusion regarding the healthfulness of juice. New research presented today at the American Dietetic Association (ADA) Annual Food and Nutrition Conference and Expo (FNCE) clearly highlight the benefits of 100 percent juice, revealing that fruit juice drinkers were more likely than non-consumers to meet recommended levels of certain key nutrients.

The new study, from researchers at the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center and Baylor College of Medicine, examined a nationally representative sample of adults 19 years of age and older and found that drinking 100 percent fruit juice was closely linked to improved nutrient intake. More specifically, the researchers used data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to compare intake of “shortfall nutrients” – those nutrients most frequently under-consumed by Americans – among juice drinkers and non-consumers.

According to the research team, adults who did not drink fruit juice were more likely to fall below recommended levels for several key nutrients, including vitamins A and C and magnesium. Additionally, a greater percentage of those consuming fruit juice exceeded recommended levels for calcium and potassium – two important minerals for promoting bone health and regulating blood pressure.

“This study supports the role of fruit juice as a nutrient dense beverage and a source of valuable vitamins and minerals,” notes lead researcher Dr. Carol O’Neil. “Drinking 100 percent juice may be one important strategy to provide some of the essential nutrients that are currently under-consumed by Americans. One hundred percent fruit juice should be encouraged as part of an overall balanced diet.”

 

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